The Snow Bride, Mirrors & Thorns

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The icy wind outside screeched and wailed like a banshee seeking to devour children’s souls. Frosted windows rattled in their frames so hard the glass threatened to shatter. The camels and horses tied to the posts in front of the Tsas Ber Tavern whickered and spat their displeasure at being left exposed in such inhospitable weather.


‘The Snow Bride’ by J.M. Ames, part of the anthology Mirrors & Thorns is now available worldwide in paperback and  eBook.

  • Paperback & Ebook
    • Available on Amazon here

Reviews:

“… the ending … felt like it combined aspects of Mrs. Lovett from Sweeney Todd, and The Thénardiers from Les Miserables. That story twist saved it for me.”

“I enjoyed Snow Bride immensely”

A perfectly sized snippet of storytelling. The brevity of the story is surprising, but the narrative feels perfectly suited to this length; a quick example of the everyday events that happen in this world. Strong details manage to simultaneously reveal character and setting without ever slowing down the pace.
Through it all there’s a jovial levity, a kind of open adventure that seems reminiscent of Robert Howard’s Conan stories. It is odd, to refer to such a grim story as jovial, but it is true. There’s a reckless abandon about the story; one that made me sorry to see it end so quickly. No unanswered questions linger, but there is a clear sense that for these characters, the adventure is never over.
+Strong, well-used details
+Dense (in a good way)
+Surprising outcome
+Short but very well done
+Grim and harsh, but also light-hearted

“My favorite would have to be The Snow Bride. J.M. Ames writes remarkably well. The story is something I’ve never heard before and something I never thought I’d enjoy. He pulled me into the story and I couldn’t wait to see what happened next. It was as if I was in the story. I won’t say what it’s about because I don’t want to spoil, but I recommend buying the book.”


Fun Facts:

  • This was originally a flash fiction piece written for a contest between friends (it lost). This version is more than twice as long as that original one.
  • The fantastical, snowy land is based off Mongolia, and most of the foreign words spoken are in fact Mongolian. The olgoi-khorkhoi tattoo mentioned is actually that of the real-life Mongolian Death Worm legend. Hence all the Yetis.
  • Ajir, the Minotaur, is actually not a local, but had migrated north from his homeland of Gryek – modeled after Greece, of course.

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